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The paradox of self-harm in prison: psychopathy or an evolved coping strategy?

Textbook 2013 86 Pages

Psychology - Forensic Psychology, Penal System

Summary

Deliberate self-harm (DSH) refers to intentionally self-inflicted injuries, and is mainly explained by abuse or neglect, severe psychopathy or at least a trait of a mental disorder. Most functions of DSH serve intrapersonal motives but interpersonal reasons are also found. These range from seeking for attention, pity and sympathy, to benefits like care, help or avoidance of unpleasant tasks or persons. To the latter belongs the deterrence of assaulters, a benefit, especially desirable for prisoners due to the hostile and brutal environment of prisons. This book scrutinizes two hypotheses of avoidance of attacks in prisons by the use of episodes of DSH as costly signals building upon the signaling theory developed in economics and biology. The first hypothesis is that DSH is an honest signal of fearlessness intended to repel other inmates from attacking. The second deals with the avoidance of assaulters by signaling madness via DSH to achieve relocation into an asylum. The underlying motive in this case is the need of protection, and thus, DSH serves as a cry for help to prison authorities. All necessary requirements of both hypotheses are examined, provided with evidence from existing research and analyzed with the help of mathematical models.

Details

Pages
86
Type of Edition
Erstausgabe
Year
2013
ISBN (eBook)
9783954896615
File size
2.8 MB
Language
English
Catalog Number
v287458
Grade
Tags
deliberate self-harm non-suicidal self-injury signalling theory theoretical biology psychology

Author

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Title: The paradox of self-harm in prison: psychopathy or an evolved coping strategy?